Blog

With spring fast approaching we want to remind everyone about all the changes and updates that are happening during this time. Don’t forget you can always email [email protected] with any questions!

 

New Site Inspection & Infill Requirement
Beginning March 1, 2018, a zoning site inspection must occur prior to foundation inspection. A zoning site inspection is required once forms for foundations are completely in place (preferably before concrete is poured). However, the owner and/or builders (at their discretion) may schedule the site inspection at the foundation stage (after concrete is poured, but prior to any framing or vertical construction occurring).

Additionally, and as part of this inspection, a survey performed by a professional land surveyor licensed in the state of North Carolina must be completed and submitted to the City of Raleigh zoning for all residential infill construction projects. The completed survey must be made available on site for examination by zoning inspections staff.

Note: Building foundation inspections will only be allowed to be scheduled once the site inspection has been completed and approved. For more details on this new requirement, click here.

 

New Visible Permit Requirement
Beginning March 1, 2018, a new visible permit will be required for all Right-of-Way (ROW) obstructions. The goal of this additional permit is to reduce the number of complaints and questions for both City staff and the contractor. Upon receiving a ROW obstruction permit, the City will issue a visible permit which is required to be posted onsite in a central location for the duration of the work. The permit will contain:
• City contact information (email and phone)
• Date work expires (to inform citizens of the duration of the project)
Contractors will be responsible for affixing the permit to a structure or signage onsite. For questions or concerns regarding the new visible permit, please email [email protected]

 

Building Code Summary
The below schedule will help clarify the new required NC Building Code Summaries:
January 1, 2018 thru June 30, 2018:
 We accept the City of Raleigh Building Code Summary.
 We accept the 2012 NC State Building Code Summary.
× We reject the 2018 NC State Building Code Summary.

July 1, 2018 thru December 31, 2018:
× We reject the City of Raleigh Building Code Summary.
 We accept the 2012 NC State Building Code Summary.
 We accept the 2018 NC State Building Code Summary.

January 1, 2019:
× We reject the City of Raleigh Building Code Summary.
× We reject the 2012 NC State Building Code Summary.
 We accept the 2018 NC State Building Code Summary.

Important Note: Designers must use the 2012 Building Codes with the 2012 Building Code Summary, and the 2018 Building Codes with the 2018 Building Code Summary.

 

Due Diligence Online Service (DDOS) Available Now!
We have replaced the face-to-face Due Diligence session with a new online version. Just like before, this service is free of charge and allows clients to learn what type of development is and isn’t possible on a specific property. It also addresses high level questions related to development. Review staff will comment on site review trades (current planning, urban forestry, stormwater, fire and transportation) only. In other words, information related only to the parcel(s) and any general regulatory items that may be applicable based on project parameters. For more information and access to the scheduling tool, click here.

 

New Locked Forms Available
New locked forms are available online for Utility Placement Easement, Sidewalk Easement and Slope Easement. The form templates can be found in the Development Services Department form directory under “S to Z.”

 

Design Adjustment Process Changes
A new design adjustment application is now available which is intended to guide applicants through all UDO-required findings associated with their request and help streamline the process. Additionally, all requests are now submitted to a central point of intake at [email protected], with notification provided to the applicant upon receipt of a complete application. Please make note that upon receipt of this message, all required mailed notifications should be hand delivered to the coordinating reviewer on the 5th floor of One Exchange Plaza. For further information, please see the Design Adjustments webpage.

Add a comment

{youtube}tJRUEkNArrQ{/youtube}

As the City of Raleigh continues to grow, we at the Development Services Department routinely seek ways to improve our processes. To address issues that may result due to property constraints and building setbacks, we will be implementing a new survey requirement for all infill lots (defined per UDO section 2.2.7), as well as for any projects with lots that appear to substantially deviate from the approved plans. Infill construction often occurs in older neighborhoods where the lot lines are no longer distinguishable.

Beginning March 1, 2018, a survey performed by a professional land surveyor licensed in the state of North Carolina, must be completed and submitted to the City of Raleigh for all infill construction projects. The City recommends that this take place once the forms are completely in place (before concrete is poured) or at the owner and/or builders discretion at the foundation stage (after concrete is poured, but prior to any framing or vertical construction occurring). This flexibility is provided to align with other entities, that at times may require a similar survey, and thus allows for combining of the two.

There will be no change to the initial plan submittal and/or application requirements. Please stay tuned for more information, both through this blog and the city website.


For the purpose of this requirement the following definition shall apply to a Foundation /Form Survey:

  • Foundation/Form survey: A sealed and signed survey by a North Carolina licensed Land Surveyor, which attests to the horizontal and vertical location of the building foundation and/or forms, which clearly indicates the set back dimensions ( on all sides and to any accessory or main buildings); any deviations from the approved plans clearly noted, and a statement that foundations and/or forms were found to be in conformity with the approved plans ( any exceptions/deviations noted). In addition an average grade reference datum benchmark , as determined by section 1.5.7 of the UDO , shall be staked on site, and protected for the zoning inspector to use for determining final height compliance at time of the building final. This reference datum location and height shall be clearly indicated/referenced in the prepared sealed document as well as the height of the top of forms or foundation relative to this datum.
  • UDO section 1.5.7 ( A) 2 “Average grade is determined by calculating the average of the highest and lowest elevations along pre development grade or improved grade ( whichever is more restrictive) along the front of the building parallel to the primary street setback. Where mass-grading has been approved by the City average grade shall be considered the improved grade following such mass grading.”
  • UDO section 1..5.7 (A ) 4 “ where the property slope increases to the rear , building height is measured from the average point at grade of the front and rear wall planes.”
Add a comment

AdminActionDSInsider1000x450

There have been some new changes made to the Preliminary Site Plan and Subdivision review and approval processes which are designed to make things more consistent and efficient for everyone involved. This should save time in what can often be a time-consuming process. The modified approval process now more clearly defines conditions and requirements that help clients stay compliant from one step of the development process to the next.

We have also established a new benchmark for the Administrative Action document. The benchmark is now 15 days from the time all reviewing trades have approved or conditionally approved the preliminary plan—which provides predictability where it previously did not exist.

So you may be wondering, “What do I do with my Administrative Action document once I have it?” Well, the document itself includes specific next steps that are clearly labeled, and to ensure that staff, property owners, developers and contractors are all “in the know” about the document it is now required to be applied to the second sheet of all future submittals with the exception of final plats.

Add a comment

DueDiligenceServiceApp1000x750
The City of Raleigh Development Services Department has replaced the face-to-face Due Diligence Session with a new online version. Just like before, this service is free of charge and allows clients to learn what development is and isn’t possible on a specific property. The Due Diligence Online Service (DDOS) will continue to address high level questions and issues related to the development of property.  Review staff will comment on site review trades (current planning, urban forestry, stormwater, fire and transportation) only.  In other words, information related only to the parcel(s) and any general regulatory items that may be applicable based on project parameters.

How do I submit for a DDOS?

  • To submit a DDOS go to the online form and fill out the property data.
  • Once staff has completed the DDOS review, each applicant will receive an email containing staff comments, based on a predetermined scope of review.

What do I need to keep in mind when submitting for a DDOS?

  • Only contiguous properties are allowed to be submitted, and multiple parcels will be reviewed as a combined assemblage.
  • Comments generated during the DDOS are based solely on existing zoning of the property.
  • If a formal development application is submitted after a DDOS, and any development details or site information have changed, it is possible that staff comments may be different from those provided during a DDOS.
  • Information received should be considered advisory-only, no approvals or permits are issued with a DDOS. If a formal regulatory-based review is desired, please consider one of our other face-to-face services.
Add a comment

PlanningRecruitment1000x750The department is embarking on a nationwide search for a new Zoning Administrator to oversee the UDO with consistency and fairness. Until the position is filled, Assistant Planning Director Travis Crane will serve as Zoning Administrator. To maintain capacity during this transitional period, the Department has hired a temporary employee that may be familiar to some: Christine Darges. Ms. Darges was previously employed as an Assistant Director in the Development Services department, where she managed the development review process. During her time with the city, she served as the project manager for the development of the UDO. Her primary focus will be text change development and assistance with zoning code interpretations. Her office is located on the third floor of One Exchange Plaza.  Ms. Darges can be reached by email at [email protected] or by phone at 919-996-2625, Tuesday – Thursday.

Stay tuned for more as the position becomes available on https://www.governmentjobs.com/careers/raleighnc.

Add a comment

GSI2Are you interested in making your development projects more “green” while meeting both stormwater management and landscape requirements for your site? The City of Raleigh recently adopted text changes to the Unified Development Ordinance (UDO) that make it easier for you to include Green Stormwater Infrastructure (GSI) practices into land development.

How it Works

GSI uses both natural and constructed landscape features that capture, absorb, and store rainwater that otherwise would go directly to storm drains and local waterways. These features remove pollution and reduce impacts from the volume of stormwater runoff that enters Raleigh streams and lakes. 

By using GSI practices, you can invest in and improve the water quality of local waterways; co-locate site features, such as adding a stormwater treatment within building setback; and more efficiently use developed land area.

GSI Benefits

Here are a few benefits to including GSI practices in your development plans:

  1. GSI features serve multiple purposes in required landscape area, which decreases development costs, conserves natural resources, and does not require stormwater management to “compete” for a site’s available land area.
  2. Installing GSI in the City right-of-way to treat stormwater runoff coming from streets can make more land area available for other uses.  You may also be eligible to receive payment from the City for the difference between traditional right-of-way infrastructure development and GSI practices.
  3. You will have more flexibility in a site’s development design to make it easier to use GSI practices.
  4. You can use more stormwater management treatment options in the Watershed Protection Overlay Districts, rather than using only traditional practices, like wetponds.

Get Started

Visit raleighnc.gov to learn more about what to expect when submitting your development site designs and plans. There is information about changes made to the UDO to incorporate GSI practices, landscaping requirements to follow when using GSI practices, and new requirements for the Falls and Swift Creek Watershed Protection Overlay Districts.

Questions can be directed to the Stormwater Management Division at [email protected] or 919-996-3940. 

Add a comment
Read our Comments Policy before you submit a comment

Get In Touch

  • Development Services
    Customer Service Center
    1 Exchange Plaza
    Raleigh, NC 27602
  • 919-996-2495
  • Litchford Road
    Satellite Office
    8320-130 Litchford Road
    Raleigh, NC 27615
  • 919-996-4200